Simone Gorrindo

Simone Gorrindo

Simone Gorrindo is a writer and editor currently based in Columbus, Georgia, where she lives with her husband, a soldier stationed at Fort Benning with the 75th Ranger Regiment. She is a Contributing Editor at Vela Magazine and the former Senior Editor of Kindle Singles. She holds an M.S. in journalism from Columbia University, and has received fellowships and grants for her writing from the Vermont Studio Center and the Hambidge Center for Creative Arts and Sciences. Her work was recently included in Byliner’s “102 Spectacular Nonfiction Stories from 2012.” Currently, she is working on her first book, a memoir about travel, long-term illness, and love. You can follow her on Twitter @SimoneGorrindo, and she can be reached at simonegorrindoATgmailDOTcom.

Stories by Simone:

  • Women We Read This Week

    Camille T. Dungy’s “A Brief History of Near and Actual Losses” in Virginia Quarterly Review At the Cape Coast Castle on the Ghanaian coast, visitors can tour the dungeons of a 350-year-old castle where, during the Atlantic slave trade, 1500 men, women, and children at a time were shackled and packed into dank rooms on […]–Read more

  • A Return to Limantour

    The sublet in Berkeley was our last resort. My father and I had been kicked out of the bottom floor of a house in Sausalito for breaking the unstable leaseholder’s plate, and we had traipsed the cold streets of San Francisco for days, looking for an affordable place. That futile mission had ultimately landed us […]–Read more

  • The Writer and the Army Wife

    Recently, I published a short essay about saying goodbye to my husband before his first deployment. The piece is, as you might imagine, a crier, and it evinced a pretty strong emotional reaction in some readers: many of them reached out to me, thanking me for reminding them that men and women throughout the country are continuing […]–Read more

  • An Unwanted Guest

    I didn’t see the jellyfish, but I felt it—a searing pain at my ankle that shot up through my leg, bringing me, in a matter of seconds, to my knees in the sand. I looked down and saw its limp, blue body floating away from me down the rivulet I’d stumbled into when the sand […]–Read more

  • Women We Read This Week

    Julialicia Case’s “Your New Neighborhood” in Witness In this vivid little essay Julialicia Case slides between the garbage, dog piss, and roadkill carnage of the place where she lives, where she walks her dog, and the virtual landscape to which she escapes. Quite simply, World of Warcraft always has sidewalks, or the equivalent. But Case sidles up to bigger questions: […]–Read more

  • Women We Read This Week

    “The Rumpus Interview With Rachel Kushner” on The Rumpus After reading The Flamethrowers, I developed a massive lady writer crush on Rachel Kushner, and this interview only stoked the flames. What I love most is her absolute refusal to reduce a very complex novel into a specific argument or interpretation. Instead she insists that the […]–Read more

  • Women We Read this Week

    Jean Friedman-Rudovsky’s “The Ghost Rapes of Bolivia” in Vice This is a story that I did not want to read because I knew it would haunt me. Over a nine-month period, Jean Friedman-Rudovsky investigated a series of rapes in a small Mennonite community in Bolivia. The resulting article, accompanied by eerie photos taken by Noah […]–Read more

  • A Hidden Writing Life

    For the first time in my life, I have a room of my own in which to write. I also have the precious commodities of solitude and time. I always hoped for these things, but my younger self—the one who moved to New York City at 17 with $300 —had a more romantic image in […]–Read more

  • Women We Read This Week

    Joanna Walsh’s “In Cyberspace: a love letter” in Granta Here is a thoroughly modern love story, largely enacted online, in “the place we all live now – that overcrowded tenement where each one of us knows a little of the other’s business,” dealing (in a beautiful, dreamy tone) with themes of space, place, and time […]–Read more

  • Women We Read this Week

    It’s exciting and encouraging to note that two of the most significant and widely discussed stories this week were by female journalists. They’re reviewed below. Jeanne Marie Laskas’s “Have You Heard the One About President Joe Biden?” in GQ Jeanne Marie Laskas’s latest piece for GQ could not open in a more Jeanne Marie Laskas […]–Read more

  • Women We Read This Week

    Francesca Borri’s “Woman’s Work” in Columbia Journalism Review This CJR piece has been making the rounds this week. It’s by an Italian freelancer in Syria, a reflection on the not-so-glamorous life of a war correspondent, and it’s a gut punch: People have this romantic image of the freelancer as a journalist who’s exchanged the certainty […]–Read more

  • Women We Read This Week

    Nicole Pasulka’s “Wanted: Macho Men With Moustaches” in The Believer I never spent a lot of time thinking about the cultural phenomenon of the Village People, or how such an incredibly gay group came to be embraced by mainstream America. By the time I came of age in the ’90s Bay Area, songs like “Macho […]–Read more

  • Women We Read This Week

    Helen Hayward’s “My children, my life,” in Aeon Magazine In this thought-provoking personal essay, Hayward challenges the assumption that a woman can’t dedicate herself equally to both her career and raising children. Hayward chose both, and loves both, even if it means working until late into the night, “accepting a double shift.” I’m not a […]–Read more

  • Women We Read This Week

    A gathering of the some of the best pieces by women we read this week. Eliza Griswold’s “Landays” in Poetry This piece of investigative reportage is nothing short of incredible. From the copious research to the stunning photos to the deft handling to the subject itself, Griswold and photographer Seamus Murphy reveal the culture of […]–Read more

  • Women We Read This Week

    A gathering of some of the best pieces by women we’ve read this week. Lauren Westerfield’s “Twenty-Seven” in The Rumpus This essay tackles a figure: one in four young women will become a victim of sexual assault. It is hard to imagine that figure, to understand what it looks like in personal terms. The author […]–Read more

  • A True War Story

    Columbus, Georgia, is, above all else, an Army infantry town, and it showed in the crowd on the Friday night that Tim O’Brien came to tell war stories: it was an audience of windbreakers and baseball hats marked by military insignia; square jaws and tattoo sleeves from shoulder to wrist; and my husband next to […]–Read more

  • Women We Read This Week

    A gathering of some of the best pieces by women we’ve read this week. Helena Fitzgerald’s “Albums of Our Lives: Bob Dylan’s Blonde on Blonde” on The Rumpus I love reading about the personal geographies of music, the memories and meanings that we place in particular songs (or that particular songs place in us; music […]–Read more

  • Women We Read this Week

    Sandra Beasley’s “–Read more

  • Women We Read This Week

    This has been a seriously amazing week for women’s writing on the web, so we’ve got a healthy list of links for you today. And we’ve welcomed a new voice to the mix — Alice Driver, our soon-to-be new staff writer! Paige Williams’ “The Ghost,” a Byliner Original I’ve had this Byliner Original on my […]–Read more

  • Women We Read This Week

    A gathering of some of the best pieces by women we’ve read this week. Caty Enders’ “There Are No Pythons Here,” in Outside When the Florida Wildlife Commission announced the Florida Python Challenge, a month-long free-for-all in which participants vied for a cash prize for the most Burmese pythons (an invasive species) killed, Outside‘s Caty […]–Read more

Thoughts?