Nikhol Esterás Roberts

Nikhol is a photographer based out of Oaxaca, Mexico, where she documents many aspects of life in Mexico, often in collaboration with grassroots nonprofit organizations working in impoverished regions of the country. Nikhol’s photography focuses on issues related to social justice, frequently in relation to immigration in Southern Mexico and Central America. Her work has been featured on the Matador Network, local newspapers and the Latin American and Latino Studies Department at UCSC, among others.

In addition to social documentation, Nikhol works as a freelance photographer for event photographers and is also currently working as the director of photography on a feature length documentary (more info coming soon!). Through photography, Nikhol captures both unique and universal stories of the people she encounters in a variety of different contexts. She has always been curious about the stories of the people she meets, wanting to know about their lives and experiences; this curiosity drives her visual story-telling. She is inspired by capturing the moments that, with the passage of time, are lost in the millions of memories that make up an entire life. She visually documents what would otherwise be lost in time, moments creating stories of fascinating courage and unimaginable strength on behalf of ordinary people.

In her free time, you’ll probably find her wandering the cobblestone streets of Oaxaca with her camera in hand while searching for a fascinating story to document or a dramatic photograph to capture, or perhaps enjoying a bendy yoga posture on someone’s roof overlooking the Oaxaca City.

Stories by Nikhol:

  • Oaxaqueando

    In Spanish, almost any noun can be fashioned into a verb by applying the suffix -eando. Sabadeando: Saturdaying. Domingueando: Sundaying. You’re not just going to the park on Sunday, or eating day-old chicharrines and watching fútbol hungover on your couch, you’re domingueando. You’re embodying the essence of the day. In this collection of street photos, […]–Read more

  • Objects of the Journey

    “What else can I do,” a 17-year-old Guatemalan migrant named Juan asked photographer Nikhol Esterás, “work on the streets?” The boy’s grandmother had recently died, and without any remaining family or the prospect of work, he headed north on the train dubbed “la bestia”–the beast–from the southern Mexican state of Chiapas to the U.S.-Mexico border, […]–Read more

Thoughts?