Helen Hayward

Helen Hayward

Helen Hayward is a freelance writer and editor with a background in magazines, psychotherapy, publishing and higher education. Until May 2012 she was editor of Tasmanian Style magazine, a lifestyle publication for which she wrote over 30 stories. She has a PhD in psychology and literature from The University of London. Her first book was, Never Marry a Girl With a Dead Father, published in the UK. She has a particular interest in family life, emotional wellbeing, the domestic arts, and social issues. Her journalism has appeared in Fiction Magazine (UK), The Age, Inside Story, Tasmanian Life, Online Forum, 40 Degrees South, and Aeon Magazine. She is currently writing A Traditional Mother Despite Myself, a reflection of 15 years of family life, while also being involved in an editing project with the University of Tasmania, and a series of talks with Fullers Bookshop. Currently living in Hobart, she has lived in Adelaide, London and Melbourne.

Stories by Helen:

  • My Husband Travels

    It was eight minutes before the taxi arrived to take my husband to the airport. We were in the bathroom, throwing toiletries into a tartan sponge bag. “Here’s your glasses cloth,” I said, treading carefully. “I’ve washed it for you. Your glasses look so much better when they’re clean.” That was it. In a last […]–Read more

Comments

  1. Hi Helen,

    Although I’m just 23 years old, I found a great deal of wisdom in what you have written. More importantly, this helped me understand the way in which my parents function and given me a sense of peace about their marriage.

    It’s a wonderful piece.

  2. Martin Klopstock says:

    Well this is strange… From coming across an acknowledgement in a novel (The Gargoyle) to a Helen Hayward, via a little excursion into the unreliability of memory, I remembered knowing a Helen H back in the 80s in London (there were others, Mehrdad (who now runs a theatre company in Cambridge), Bronwyn from Adelaide, Tine and Jens from Denmark… Including John Armstrong). We weren’t bosom buddies but we meet up several times while John was still finishing his PhD with Roger Scruton. You were into Sylvia Plath at the time. And now here you are and your piece beautifully fills in the time in between. A lovely surprise and all the better for knowing that life turned out well for you – despite its inevitable challenges. Nice one :-) Greetings from a London seemingly long ago, but revived in an instant. Martin

Thoughts?