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Women We Read This Week

Nikole Hannah-Jones’ "Resegregation in the American South" in The Atlantic Focusing on the experiences of three generations of Tuscaloosa, Alabama residents, Nikole Hannah-Jones paints a depressing and accurate picture of resegregation in the American South. She addresses the very real fact that, despite Brown v. Board of Education in 1954, segregation is still very ... [Continue Reading]

women-we-read-this-week-12

Women We Read This Week

"It's Always Spilling Over the Edges": Jamie Green interviews Leslie Jamison on BuzzFeed I've been loving Leslie Jamison's essays from her new collection, The Empathy Exams, that have come out recently in The Believer and Harper's. They're narratives that plunge into the frustrating world of doctor-patient communication and the vulnerability of a patient's narrative. ... [Continue Reading]

women-we-read-this-week-12

Women We Read This Week

Rachel Monroe's "Fire Behavior" in Oxford American Read enough literary journalism and it becomes easy to trace the intentions and arguments of a piece from the start; this transparency, established in tidy lede and nut graf, doesn't necessarily mean a piece won't contain surprises or complexity, but does tend to establish a certain predictability. Readers must keep ... [Continue Reading]

women-we-read-this-week-12

Women We Read This Week

Donna Seaman’s "Turning out the lights just isn’t going to do it" in Creative Nonfiction In the movie Bang the Drum Slowly, there’s a card game called “The Exciting Game without Any Rules,” and I think that’s a good description of writing in general. It’s true of nonfiction writing in the sense that you are at the mercy of events. You go out, and you ... [Continue Reading]

women-we-read-this-week-12

Women We Read This Week

Emily Gould’s "How Much My Novel Cost Me" on Medium I am a fan of reading about other writers’ tortured moments of procrastination, drinking, gambling, and thoughts of delusional grandeur. It is always good to be reminded that people can really fuck up and waste time but still eventually get their shit together. Or even that you can seemingly be successful, get a ... [Continue Reading]

women-we-read-this-week-12

Women We Read This Week

Kima Jones' "The Aqiqah," in Midnight Breakfast It's always exciting to see a new literary site launch, especially when it includes complimentary original artwork. But when I saw that Kima Jones was included in the inaugural issue of Midnight Breakfast, I was even more excited. I've been following Jones' poetry and Twitter feed for a while, but this is was the first ... [Continue Reading]

women-we-read-this-week-12

Women We Read This Week

Ali Smith's "The Human Claim" at Liberty I love the way Ali Smith writes, so I was happy to find this piece amidst 80 author responses to the theme of "liberty." Here she draws a line from the ashes of D.H. Lawrence to credit card fraud to Google Streetview to Harmondsworth to Lawrence again, capturing a certain universal ridiculousness in life through moments of ... [Continue Reading]

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Women We Read This Week

Ruth Fowler's "The Loneliest and Saddest Kind" on Guernica It was fitting that I should find Ruth Fowler's essay this week, as I was working on an essay of my own about addiction narratives. Fowler's piece exemplified the kind of unredemptive, messy depiction of recovery that I felt was missing from the cannon of addiction narratives for so long. Her characters here ... [Continue Reading]

women-we-read-this-week-12

Women We Read This Week

Leslie Jamison’s "The Empathy Exams: A Medical Actor Writers Her Own Script" in The Believer In Leslie Jamison’s brilliant (seriously, please go read it right now) essay “The Empathy Exams: A Medical Actor Writes Her Own Script,” Jamison compares and contrasts playing a patient (as a medical actor) with being a real one (describing her abortion and heart ... [Continue Reading]

women-we-read-this-week-12

Women We Read This Week

Maria Konnikova’s “An Antidote for Mindlessness” on The New Yorker’s Science and Tech “Elements” blog If you practice yoga and meditation, you know the word: mindfulness, and if you’re like me, it strikes terror. Sprawled on the mat, you’re supposed to focus on your breath but all you can do is imagine the pizza maker, whose shop shares the building with ... [Continue Reading]