Women We Read This Week

Women We Read This Week

Sara Bernard's "Rape Culture in the Alaskan Wilderness" in The Atlantic Sara Bernard's piece in The Atlantic this week is a feat of reporting about the high prevalence of rape in Alaska, "the rape capital of the U.S." On top of her haunting details about the rural landscape, a place where victims of sexual assault are often forced to conduct their own ... [Continue Reading]

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Women We Read This Week

Jenny Nordberg's “The Afghan Girls Who Live as Boys” in The Atlantic At school, Mahnoush is known as Mehran; at work, Niima is called Abdul Mateen. These girls do not know each other, but they do know what it is to have an open gateway into the world around them—as boys. They are bacha posh, girls dressed as boys, an uncommon but not unusual practice in ... [Continue Reading]

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Women We Read This Week

Lucinda Williams' "Where the Spirit Meets the Bone: A Memoir" on the Longreads Blog Nothing satisfies like a Lucinda Williams song. Her words, emanating from her achy soul and propelled—with great will, it sometimes seems—up through her gravelly throat always launch me on a sad, nostalgic bender, sending me adrift into a land of heartache and pain that seems to have ... [Continue Reading]

Women We Read This Week

Women We Read This Week

Camille T. Dungy's "A Brief History of Near and Actual Losses" in Virginia Quarterly Review At the Cape Coast Castle on the Ghanaian coast, visitors can tour the dungeons of a 350-year-old castle where, during the Atlantic slave trade, 1500 men, women, and children at a time were shackled and packed into dank rooms on the eve of their journeys out of Africa. In 2013 ... [Continue Reading]

Illustration: Jenny Williams

Women We Read This Week

Jeanne Marie Laskas’s "The New Face of Richard Norris" in GQ Richard Norris’s face transplant is life-threatening cosmetic surgery, and the fact that that would ever feel necessary tells us something deeply uncomfortable about the world we live in. Laskas approaches this delicately, through the layers of stories that have been built up around Norris: He is a ... [Continue Reading]

Illustration: Jenny Williams

Women We Read This Week

Janet Malcolm's "Iphigenia in Forest Hills" in The New Yorker In the erratic throes of new motherhood, I've been doing a lot of baby rocking while watching episode after episode of The Good Wife. In the process I've developed killer biceps and a fascination with the byzantine machinations of the legal system. It seems fateful, then, that in browsing through the endless ... [Continue Reading]

Women We Read This Week

Women We Read This Week

Sabrina Rubin Erdely's "The Transgender Crucible" in Rolling Stone At one point in the story of CeCe MacDonald, a trans woman who was charged with murder after defending herself from a violent attack, her defense lawyer tells Rolling Stone reporter Sabrina Rubin Erdely that his task was to inform the jury about the habitual violence trans women face. "We'd have to be ... [Continue Reading]

Women We Read This Week

Women We Read This Week

Rachel Riederer’s "The Teaching Class" in Guernica I read Riederer’s piece about a month ago, and though at first it didn’t stand out to me, I’ve found that my mind keeps wandering back to it. What first seemed another piece about the injustice of adjunct workers in higher education has become that article I’m repeatedly referring people to. I suppose ... [Continue Reading]

Women We Read This Week

Women We Read This Week

Meredith Broussard's "Why Poor Schools Can't Win at Standardized Testing" on The Atlantic Forget for a moment the irony of an article critiquing financial biases in public education leading to a pop-up ad for a $50,000 Masters of Education program at USC. Meredith Broussard's work of investigate journalism digs into the flawed system of standardized testing that has ... [Continue Reading]

Women We Read This Week

Women We Read This Week

Cornelia Hesse-Honegger's "Why I Traveled the World Hunting for Mutant Bugs" on Nautilus In this thought-provoking piece on her role as a scientific illustrator, Hesse-Honegger begins this piece with a beautifully rendered description of her painting process--exacting and scientific in itself, but not without a philosophical bent: "When I look at my insects through the ... [Continue Reading]

Women We Read This Week

Women We Read This Week

Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich’s "Towards a Fight" in The Rumpus It’s difficult to summarize Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich’s “Towards a Fight” not only because it is so wide-spanning, but also because it is infinitely quotable. Marzano-Lesnevich writes about gay rights in the North and the South; she writes about New Orleans, a place fraught with challenges ... [Continue Reading]

Women We Read This Week

Women We Read This Week

Lizzy Goodman's "Kendrick Lamar, Hip-Hop's Newest Old-School Star" in The New York Times Magazine On the surface, this is a well-done profile of unexpected It hip-hop star Kendrick Lamar. Goodman depicts Lamar's struggles to balance the demands of fame and life on the road, with need for personal space in which to write highly anticipated new songs--and to stay sane. ... [Continue Reading]

Women We Read This Week

Women We Read This Week

Sara Corbett's "The Unbearable Lightness of Being the Boarder Queen" in Outside Never mind the mixed-up byline (the online version credits Michael Llewellyn). This March 2000 profile of pro skateboarder and snowboarder Cara-Beth Burnside is by the great Sara Corbett, and I read it the old-fashioned way a couple of nights ago: in print, in Outside's 25th anniversary ... [Continue Reading]

Women We Read This Week

Women We Read This Week

Quinn Norton's "The Land That Never Has Been Yet" on Medium In her most recent piece for Medium, writer Quinn Norton begins with: It’s hard to write about your mom. She looms over you — at first literally — then over your life, like a mythic mountain laced with the river you drink from. And even as you travel away through time and she seems to get ... [Continue Reading]

Women We Read This Week

Women We Read This Week

Julia Baird's "The Writing is on the Wall" in The New York Times In this article, Baird explores issues of graffiti, gender, and public space. Female graffiti artists, who in the past represented .01% of the graffiti community, have now climbed to .1%, a figure that still strikes me as impossibly low and speaks to how safe women feel in public space. When I was ... [Continue Reading]

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Women We Read This Week

Rachele Kanigel’s "The Shadow Sex" in San Francisco magazine On November 4 of last year, Fleischman, who identifies as agender—neither male nor female—was set on fire while sleeping on an AC Transit bus on the way home from school. A surveillance camera captured video of another teen igniting Fleischman’s skirt with a lighter, and the following day police ... [Continue Reading]

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Women We Read This Week

Rose Lichter-Marck's "Vivian Maier and the Problem of Difficult Women" in The New Yorker Vivian Maier worked as a nanny in Chicago between the nineteen-fifties and the nineteen-seventies. She took hundreds of thousands of photos in New York, France, South America, and Asia and, like some modern-day Emily Dickinson, she showed her artwork to almost no one. It was only ... [Continue Reading]

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Women We Read This Week

Eva Saulitis's "Wild Darkness" in Orion For the past twenty-six years, Eva Saulitis has hiked trails along streams in Prince William Sound observing humpbacked salmon. She sees the salmon cycle through her own experience with incurable metastatic breast cancer. Saulitis is a whale researcher, and in September, when the salmon are spawning and dying, she’s at the end ... [Continue Reading]

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Women We Read This Week

Alice Bolin's "The Oldest Story: Toward a Theory of a Dead Girl Show," in the Los Angeles Review of Books I like True Detective the way I like Bad Brains--I appreciate the artistry while at the same time maintaining criticism of of the inherent misogyny/homophobia/what-have-you. Unlike Bad Brains, though, I don't think True Detective pushes any aesthetic or cultural ... [Continue Reading]

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Women We Read This Week

Erica Wagner's "Life and death at his fingertips: watching a brain surgeon at work" in The New Statesman This was published last month, but it popped up on my radar this week, and I'm very glad it did. On one level, it's a riveting portrait of a neurosurgeon. Wagner writes fluently about a world that's fascinating but entirely alien to me; at one point, observing a ... [Continue Reading]