Illustration: Jenny Williams

Women We Read This Week

Patsy Sims' "No Twang of Conscience Whatever" in Oxford American In “No Twang of Conscience Whatever,” Patsy Sims investigates the 1964 murders of civil rights activists Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney – an investigation which leads her to the Ku Klux Klan’s White Knights of Mississippi and a chilling interview with Preacher Edgar Ray ... [Continue Reading]

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Women We Read This Week

Rachel Sturtz's "Unprotected" in Outside Colorado-based Rachel Sturtz spent a year investigating this story, about USA Swimming's handling of coaches who sexually abuse and assault the young swimmers in their care. The national governing body for amateur swimming hasn't just turned a blind eye to serial predators in its ranks, it has also gone out of its way to obstruct ... [Continue Reading]

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Bookmarked: Katie Coyle’s Five Young Adult Authors

If you don’t read Young Adult fiction, you would be forgiven for thinking of it in terms of a few select titles. That’s because the blockbuster book, so rare in the world of literary fiction, still appears regularly on YA bookshelves. Sometimes I think it’s the popularity of these books that make it so easy for adult readers to associate literature for teens only ... [Continue Reading]

Photo by Nicki Varkevisser

Nocturne

There is a class of seniors in my library. Their teacher is stuck in a meeting with the superintendent and his classroom is locked. I have gathered them in from the hall, where they were being absurdly noisy. They are still being absurdly noisy, but at least in here I can contain it, close the doors, shut the lights, and collect their hubbub in. I could raise my voice at ... [Continue Reading]

Illustration: Jenny Williams

Women We Read This Week

Lionel Shriver’s "I was poor but I was happy" in The Guardian What a lovely thing to wake up to on a weekday morning: an articulate little musing on happiness that never veers into sentimental or apologetic territory and makes you glad to have read it. Shriver uses a geographical metaphor to suggest a more complex - and realistic - understanding of happiness: as a ... [Continue Reading]

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Awareness

The night I move in, I sit in my darkened kitchen and sip wine next to the open window. I watch as the cops pull up beside a black teenager who is walking on the sidewalk across the street. They say something to him, get out of their squad car, and pat him down. One of the cops glances up, sees me peering out. After a few minutes, they pull away and the lanky teenager is ... [Continue Reading]

Women We Read This Week

Women We Read This Week

Sarah Schweitzer's "Chasing Bayla" in The Boston Globe For the second time in two months, my "Women We Read This Week" pick is a sad, moving story about a whale. But while Leslie Jamison's 52 Blue was about loneliness and the way we so often transpose our own feelings onto animals, imagining that they feel the same way, "Chasing Bayla" is about the undeniable physical ... [Continue Reading]

Illustration: Jenny Williams

Women We Read This Week

Irina Reyn's "The Photograph" in Brain, Child In the Facebook era, the absence of public documentation of certain events in one's life speaks as loudly as the visible display of others. What are we leaving out of our public narratives and why? In this elegant essay, at once tender and reluctant, Irina Reyn speaks to her wariness of sharing photos of her baby. "To ... [Continue Reading]

Women We Read This Week

Women We Read This Week

Abigail Rasminsky’s "I’m Pregnant. So Why Can’t I Tell You?" in Medium When Abigail Rasminsky got pregnant she told only family and close friends. In this essay, she questions why exactly the first trimester is viewed by many as a secret. Considering one in five pregnancies end in miscarriage and the early stage is deemed the most risky, Rasminsky speculates ... [Continue Reading]